Errata in Thinking Like an Engineer, 1e

Part 1: Engineering Essentials

Chapter 1: Everyday Engineering

Chapter 2: Ethics

Chapter 3: Design and Teamwork

Page 58: ICA 3-2

At the end of the building phase, your team must step away from the bridge tower and remove …

 

 

Chapter 4: Engineering Communication

Page 75, first paragraph:
The two items ... Paste Special > JPEG command or a similar picture format command (PNG, Bitmap) and then sized appropriately.

Part 2: Problem Paradigms

Chapter 5: Estimation

Page 110: Paragraph describing accuracy:

The larger the difference between the measured value and the actual value then the measurement is accurate, is the error in the measurement.

 

Page 116:  ICA 5 - 2: Lettering scheme

The reuse of letters in this problem make it difficult to assign only certain parts of this problem.  Re-letter all items, starting at (a) Your height in meters and ending with (n) The volume of your body in units of gallons.

Chapter 6: SOLVEM

Page 123: Margin Box on List of Variables and Constants

…units

record of information

location …

Chapter 7: Graphing Guidelines

Example 7 - 8, page 149:

In text immediately following the graph:

The two lines cross at time 5 0.75 seconds...  The value of "5" should not appear in this sentence.

 

Figure 7 - 16: Breakeven analysis definitions.

The abscissa axis of this graph should be labeled:  Amount produced (G) [gal] x 10^6

The ordinate axis of this graph should be labeled:  Total Cost (TC) or Revenue (R) [$] x 10^6

 

Comprehension Check 7-7, Page 151:

Legend of graph is incorrect.  Orange, dash-dot line should be labeled as Revenue; grey dash line should be labeled as Cost Machine 1.

The abscissa axis of this graph should be labeled:  Length of Wire (L) [ft] x 10^6

The ordinate axis of this graph should be labeled:  Total Cost (TC) or Revenue (R) [$] x 10^6

 

Example 7 - 10:

The equation for the Shockley equation is incorrectly shown.  It should read:

I = I0 * (e ^ (VD / (n VT)) - 1)

Chapter 8: Interpolation

Page 171: Example 8 - 4
Equation At 0 mph and 22.3 °F, we get ... Left hand side of the equation should read (WCT - 30) / (20 - 30) = ...

Chapter 9: Statistics

Page 182, Example 9-2:  In both places below, replace the period with a comma:

Calculation of Variance:  = 105.059 should be 105,059

Calculation of Standard Deviation`=sqrt(105.059)` should be `sqrt(105,059)`

 

Page 196, Rule 5:  …in Zone A; all three points occur on the same side of the mean.

Page 197, Rule 6:  …in Zone B; all five points occur on the same side of the mean.

Problem Paradigms Review

Page 207, Question 2-9:  In the second sentence, add the following words:

The data table gives measured values for the average kilograms of broomsedge per hectare...

 

Page 210, Question 2-16

...how much total energy was delivered to the interior lights?  Create a graph of power (ordinate) versus time (abscissa) and use the graph to find the total energy delivered by determining the area under the curve.

 

Page 210, Question 2-17

One of the 22 named, derived units in the metric system is the volt, which can be expressed as one joule per coulomb (V = J/C).  A coulomb is the total electric charge on approximately 6.24 x1018 electrons.  The voltage on a capacitor, an electrical device that can store electric charge, is given by V = ΔQ/C + V0 volts, where ΔQ is the change in charge [coulombs] stored, V0 is the initial voltage on the capacitor, and C is the capacitance [farads]. Create a proper plot of voltage (V, on the ordinate) and change in charge (ΔQ, on the abscissa) for a 5 farad capacitor with an initial voltage of 5 volts for 0 < ΔQ < 20 and use this plot to determine the total energy stored in the capacitor for an addition of 15 coulombs. V = 0.2 Q + 5 volts, where Q is the total charge in units of coulombs stored. Create a proper plot of voltage (V, on the ordinate) and total charge (Q, on the abscissa) and use this plot to determine the total energy stored in the capacitor.

 

Page 216, Question 2-27

In Cosine Table B, for Angle = 10°, cos (θ) = 0.9848, not 0.9480 

 

Page 219, Question 2-34:  Replace the entire text with the following:

You work for a company developing a new hybrid car. Before releasing it to the market, the company has conducted many tests to assess different aspects of the cars’ performance. For each characteristic being tested, 500 non-hybrid cars of the same basic design as the new hybrids are tested along with 500 hybrids. The non-hybrid tests are considered the baseline.

You are given six plots showing the results of testing different aspects of the cars’ performance. For each type of test described below, determine which plot is most likely to represent the results of that particular test and explain why. Depending on the characteristic being assessed the abscissa variable will vary.

(a) This test assesses gas mileage. The hybrid cars are supposed to have better gas mileage than the non-hybrids.

(b) This test assesses horsepower of the gasoline engine in both hybrid and non-hybrid cars. To ensure engine efficiency, the computer-controlled ignition sequence for the hybrids must have less car-to-car variation than the non-hybrids, thus providing better performance (horsepower).

(c) This test assesses acceleration time. For the non-hybrid cars, the average 0 to 60 mph acceleration time is 8 seconds. For the hybrid models, it was determined that only 3 of the 500 cars had times of more than 11 seconds. Since the complex manufacturing process for the new hybrids still has some kinks in it, the hybrids don’t perform as consistently as the non-hybrid. Assume the hybrids and non-hybrids had the same average acceleration time. 

Part 3: Ubiquitous Units

Chapter 10: Fundamental Dimensions and Base Units

Page 237, Example 10 - 2:  The second row of the table, the answer to "With Prefix" should read 306.0 nV, not 306.0 pV.
 
Page 248, CC 10-6 (b):  The answer should be 0.16 m^3.  The answer in the back of the book on page 581 (given as 0.042 m^3) is incorrect.
Page 248, CC 10-6 (c):  The answer should be 1042 L.  The answer in the back of the book on page 581 (given as 1058 L) is incorrect.
 

Chapter 11: Universal Units

Page 280, Comprehension Check 11-8

The split between CC 11-8 and a Reasonableness Rules sidebar box is incorrect.  This should look like:

Comprehension Check 11-8

An object is completely submerged in a liquid of density 0.75 grams per cubic centimeter at a depth of 3 meters. What is the total pressure on the object? State your answer in atmospheres.

--

Reasonableness Rules:

  • At an elevation of 3 miles, the pressure will be about half that at sea level. At an elevation of 10 miles, the pressure is about 1/10 that at sea level.
  • Cakes and meats may require as much as 1/4 more cooking time at elevations of 5000 feet because of reduced pressure and lower boiling points.

 

 

Page 282, Energy Important Concept Sidebar

In the sidebar box, the equations shown for Kinetic Energy are incorrect.  The final subscripts show "t" in both equations.  This should read "i", for "initial".  The equations shown in the appendix on page 603 are correct.

 


Chapter 12: Dimensionless Numbers

Page 308, Steps for Rayleigh's Method 
Step 2 should read: ..."to the proper exponent groups from Step 1."  Remove the reference to Step 3 from this sentence.
 

Ubiquitous Units Review

Page 321, Question 3-11

The distance travelled in a car an experimental spacecraft depends on …

The equation that … of the car spacecraft is …

If a car an experimental spacecraft


Page 321, Question 3-16

in air is 343 m / s meters per secondAssume the travel time …

 

Page 323, Question 3-27

Convert 200 20 grams …

 

Page 324, Question 3-40

…withstand a temperature of 950 1950 kelvin.

 

Page 327, Question 3-87

(a) `(cal)/(kg\ ^\circC)` should be `J/(kg\ K)`

Page 330, Question 3-100

In previous examples, we discussed quantities with fundamental dimensions of mass {M}, length {L}, time {T}, and temperature {Θ}. As we study other fields, such as electricity and magnetism, we must introduce new fundamental dimensions, such as {Q}{I}, representing charge electric current, which cannot be expressed in terms of mass, length, time, or temperature.

Electric power can be calculated as P = I2 R, where R is the resistance [ohms, Ω] and I is the electric current [amperes, A or coulombs per second]. The coulomb is a unit with a fundamental dimension of {Q}, as described above.  Assuming that electric power must have the same dimension as mechanical power, derive the dimensions of the ohm in terms of the fundamental dimensions mass {M}, length {L}, time {T}, temperature {Θ}, and charge {Q}electric current {I}.

 

Page 332, Question 3-108

…Plot the drag on the ordinate and the velocity of the object on the abscissa for each fluid on a separate plot.

Part 4: Scrupulous Spreadsheets

Chapter 13: Excel Workbooks

Page 348:  In the picture, cell A7 should read Planetary Body and not Planet

Page 348: In the first table, the first velocity entry should be 10 and not 20

Page 355: = VLOOKUP("Sally",A1:D4,3,FALSE)

Page 358:  In the table, first column should read Planetary Body and not Planet

ICA 13 – 4: 

New wording:  For the paragraph that begins "Here, L is …" the first sentence should be changed to read:

In this equation, L is ... and C is the capacitance in units of farads. Note that the capacitance values in the table are given in microfarads.


Chapter 14: Excel Graphs

Example 14 - 2, Page 384:

Equations for projectile motion are incorrect.  Corrected equations should read:

x(t) = v cos(Θ) t

y(t) = -1/2 g t2 + v sin(Θ) t

 

ICA 14-11, Page 393-394:

Equation should read:  y = A sin (c x - k t)

With this change, screen shot is out of date.  The parameter "c" must be included in the list, with units of 1/ft.ICA 14-11 screenshot

Additional wording change:  Hold the F9 key .... with different values of amplitude, c and k.

Chapter 15: Models and Systems

Page 396: …please review graphing trendline basics in Appendix D …


Page 406: …unit of stoke … should be …unit of stokes

 

Page 407: In the table at the top of the page, the units of kinematic viscosity should be in centistokes [cSt] and not stokes [St]

 

Page 418:  In the section "What is "e"?  The exponential constant "e" is a transcendental number (thus also an irrational number) an irrational number that can be truncated rounded to 2.71828.

 

Page 419:  Final calcuation in the example should be ≈603,000,000 transistors.

 

Page 427: ICA 15-11

(b) …units of "-5E05" … should be …units of "-5E-05" …


Page 428: ICA 15-11

In all graphs shown, Altitude should be abbreviated (A), not (h).  This change needs to occur in both the axis labels and the trendline equations for Figures 1 - 3.

Chapter 16: Mathematical Models

Page 453: ICA 16-6

In data table, Output Frequency should be abbreviated (f), not (F)

Page 456: ICA 16-12

In the graph, abscissa label should be Current (I) [A], not Current (A) [A]

Page 457: ICA 16-15

Add final sentence:  Determine the friction factor for this system.

Page 457: ICA 16-16

Add final sentence:  Determine the friction factor for this system.

Page 458, Graph:

Moody Diagram shown has incorrect gridlines for ordinate values in log plot.  Have requested this to be redrawn.  Diagram is also shown on page 479.

Scrupulous Spreadsheets Review

Page 459: Question 4-2:

The height and speed velocity of …

 

Page 462: Question 4-10:

…generate a histogram and CDF: use in Excel…

 

Page 465: Question 4-18:

Graph shown on left: ordinate axis label should read [lbm/(ft s)] not [lbm/ft s)]

 

Page 465: Question 4-19:

In equation for Np, power of n should be 3, not 2.

For part (b), change the curve from Curve C to Curve B.

For part (c) on the top of page 466, add the words:  The density of acetone is 0.785 grams per cubic centimeter.  Use Curve B in the graph to determine your answer.

 

Page 466: Question 4-20:

For part (d) on the top of page 467: … drag of 100 10 is produced …

 

Page 466: Question 4-21:

Methyl ethyl ketone … of 0.0043 grams per centimeter second.

 

Page 469: Question 4-22:

In the table, change the following data points:

Cell A10:  from 1300 to 1900 

Cell A12: from 1310 to 2010 

Cell B12: from 56 to 6

 

Page 479, Graph:

Moody Diagram shown has incorrect gridlines for ordinate values in log plot.  Have requested this to be redrawn.  Diagram is also shown on page 458.

Part 5: Punctilious Programming

Chapter 17: Algorithms, Programs, and Functions

Page 487:  As an experienced programmer...


Page 494:  For each diamond on a flowchart, at least three arrows…

 

Page 517:  ...hyper sonic.  Assume the user will enter the speed of the object, and the program will determine the Mach Number.  As output, the program will display the Mach rating.  Refer ...

Chapter 18: Input/Output in MATLAB

Page 519:
 

First paragraph, last sentence:  "...that can be read and interpreted as if it..."
 

Page 521:  Example 18-3
 

The following screen shot is missing from this example.
 


 

  
Page 522:  Table 18-2
 

In the example column, the entries for are incorrect; the first example contains the percent symbol in the wrong location, the second and third rows are missing a final single quote (').  They should appear as:
 

fprintf('%0.1f',Variable);

 

fprintf ('%e', Variable);
 

fprintf ('%E', Variable);
 



 

Page 532:  ICA 18-3
 

Second sentence should read "Write the MATLAB output statement..."
 

  
Page 533:  ICA 18 - 4
 

...[amperes, A].  Create a proper plot of the data.  Create a proper plot of the experimental data.
 

  
Page 536:  ICA 18-13
 

The resistance of a typical carbon film resistor will decrease by about 0.05% of its stated value for each degree Celsius increase in temperature. Silicon is very sensitive to temperature, decreasing its resistance by about 7% for each degree Celsius increase in temperature. This can be a serious problem in modern electronics and computers since silicon is the primary material from which many electronic devices are fabricated. Most metals, on the other hand, increase their resistance as temperature increases, and seldom more than 0.5% per degree Celsius. The temperature coefficient of resistance (α) [°C-1] is negative if the resistance decreases with increasing temperature, and vice versa. Silicon, for example, has α = -0.07 [°C-1] (a negative 7% decrease per degree Celsius as mentioned earlier). Gold, on the other hand, has α = 0.0037 [°C-1] so its resistance increases less than 0.4% per degree Celsius. Most values of resistance and the temperature coefficient α are based on a reference resistance at 20 °C, more or less room temperature. For relatively small temperature differences from the reference temperature, this process is essentially linear. Create a proper plot to compare a carbon film resistor with a resistor fabricated from specially doped silicon. (“doped” means impurities such as phosphorus or boron have been added to the silicon).
 

Correct data table for the problem:
 

Temperature (T) [°C] Resistance (R) [Ω]
Carbon Film Doped  Silicon
15 10.050 10.15
20 10.048 9.85
25 10.045 9.48

Chapter 19: Logic & Conditionals

Page 543, Table 19-2:  First entry should be 104 not 04

 

Page 552, ICA 19-10:  Phase should read "FCC+L," not "FCC+LL"

Chapter 20: Looping Structures

Page 565: ICA 20-11

… within 1% (TargetNum ± 0.01*N).

Punctilious Programming Review

Page 572:  Question 5-29

The eutectic line is at 300 degrees Celsius. and the eutectic point occurs when the composition is 50% B.

(Note the period in the middle of this sentence should not be there!)


Page 572:  Question 5-30

<http://www.denislindsell.demon.co.uk/pasture/soils/ http://www.pasture4horses.com/soils/hand-texturing.php>

 

Page 572:  Question 5-30

In the table, the “No” column for Question 10 should read End, not Restart unless organic.

 

Page 574:  Question 5-36

In the table, the “I” column for k = 7 should read 5040, not 5020.

 

Page 575:

In the Note box, add an open square bracket:
… you should get
[1.6 2.3 3.0…

Appendices

Appendix A

Appendix A.8: Matrices -- In the paragraph on Matrix Terminology, the paragraph should read:

Typically, the dimension of a ... N is the number of columns in the structure.  If the elements of an array are arranged in a single row instead of a column, the dimension of that array is M x 1 1 x N, where M is the total number of elements in the array.  In mathematics, it is common to refer to an M x 1 1 x N matrix as a row vector or horizontal vector.  Likewise, if the elements of an array are arranged in a single column instead of a row, the dimension of that array is M x 1 1 x N, where N is the total number of elements in the array.  Arrays arranged as a M x 1 1 x N structure are often referred to as column vectors or horizontal vectors.  When an array...

 

The corrected paragraph now reads:

An array is a collection of numbers arranged in a row or column structure.  Mathematicians and engineers will often use the words array and vector interchangeably to refer to the exact same structure.  The dimension of a mathematical structure like an array refers to the number of rows and columns in the structure.  Typically, the dimension of a mathematical structure is given as M x N, where M is the number of rows in the structure and N is the number of columns in the structure.  If the elements of an array are arranged in a single row, the dimension of that array is 1 x N, where N is the total number of elements in the array.  In mathematics, it is common to refer to a 1 x N matrix as a row vector.  Likewise, if the elements of an array are arranged in a single column, the dimension of that array is M x 1, where M is the total number of elements in the array.  Arrays arranged as a M x 1 structure are often referred to as column vectors.  When an array is represented mathematically, the sequence of numbers are contained within square brackets (“[ ]”) and separated by white space.

Appendix B1

Appendix B2

Appendix C1

Appendix C2

Appendix D

Page D-13:  Question 3

The resistance of a typical carbon film resistor will decrease by about 0.05% of its stated value for each degree Celsius increase in temperature. Silicon is very sensitive to temperature, decreasing its resistance by about 7% for each degree Celsius increase in temperature. This can be a serious problem in modern electronics and computers since silicon is the primary material from which many electronic devices are fabricated. Most metals, on the other hand, increase their resistance as temperature increases, and seldom more than 0.5% per degree Celsius. The temperature coefficient of resistance (α) [°C-1] is negative if the resistance decreases with increasing temperature, and vice versa. Silicon, for example, has α = -0.07 [°C-1] (a negative 7% decrease per degree Celsius as mentioned earlier). Gold, on the other hand, has α = 0.0037 [°C-1] so its resistance increases less than 0.4% per degree Celsius. Most values of resistance and the temperature coefficient α are based on a reference resistance at 20 °C, more or less room temperature. For relatively small temperature differences from the reference temperature, this process is essentially linear. Create a proper plot to compare a carbon film resistor with a resistor fabricated from specially doped silicon. (“doped” means impurities such as phosphorus or boron have been added to the silicon).

Correct data table for the problem:

Temperature (T) [°C] Resistance (R) [Ω]
Carbon Film Doped  Silicon
15 10.050 10.15
20 10.048 9.85
25 10.045 9.48

 

Page D-15:  Question 7

… formatted exponential trendline for each resistance diode.

End Papers

Comprehension Check Answers:

Page 581:  CC 10-6 (b) should be 0.16 m3, not 0.042 m3

Page 581:  CC 10-6 (c) should be 1042 L, not 1058 L

Page 581:  CC 10-7 missing this table:

Page 581: The answer given for CC 10-7, L^0.5 T^-1, is actually the answer to CC 10-8.

 

 Page 581: The answer given for CC 10-8, 1.73 * 10^5 mm^2, is actually the answer to CC 10-9.

 

Page 581: The answer given for CC 10-9, 2.72 gal, is actually the answer to CC 10-10.

Page 581:  CC 10-10 answer is missing; should be 2.7 gal.

Page 581:  CC 11-3 answer should be 3122 lbm/ft3

Page 581:  CC 11-4 answer should be SG = 1.53

 

Index:

Page 594:  Add: Poise, 406

 

Geometric Formulas:

Page 603:  Under CIRCLE, change the word "Perimeter" to "Circumference"